Recently a video clip of a young female student at one of Zambia’s expensive colleges, the Zambia Centre for Accountancy College (ZCAS), having sex with her boyfriend surfaced on a hardcore pornography website (link and site name withheld) and went viral among Zambian netizens who liberally shared the link.

Zambia is a culturally conservative and Christian nation in which such a video clip is considered immoral and also illegal under the Penal Code Act Chapter 87 of the Laws of Zambia, which makes it an offense to make and distribute obscene materials.

In 1996, the government demanded the removal of a banned edition of from the newspaper’s website by threatening to hold the internet service provider (ISP), Zamnet, criminally liable for the content.

There were no other reported incidents of internet censorship until July 2013, when four independent online news outlets were blocked, purportedly by the government for their critical coverage of the Patriotic Front (PF) ruling party under President Michael Sata.

The Zambian Drug Enforcement Commission has detained a number of tourists for possession of anti-histamines such as Benadryl and other over-the-counter medications which contained small quantities of diphenhydramine, an active ingredient that is on Zambia's list of controlled substances.

Although unaware of these restrictions, the tourists were charged with drug-trafficking offenses and were jailed.

When it comes to issues of “morality”, there is quite something to be said about male immunity against being tried and condemned in the courts of public opinion…and women’s lack of such immunity.

And so when consensual sex finds itself being categorised as a scandal, you can be sure you will hear the woman’s name much longer after her partner has even forgotten he was ever part of the case. For several days now, Zambian cyberspace has been abuzz with reactions to a “sex tape”, featuring a college couple from the Zambia Centre for Accountancy Studies (ZCAS) that has been leaked and circulated online.Zambia was among the early adopters of the internet in sub-Saharan Africa with the installation of dial-up and satellite technology at the University of Zambia in the early 1990s.It was also incidentally one of the first countries in the region to censor online content.Access to information and communication technologies (ICTs) in Zambia has increased steadily over the past few years, from a penetration rate of 10 percent in 2010 to over 17 percent in 2014, according to the International Telecommunication Union (ITU).[1] However, mobile phone penetration increased more rapidly, growing from 49 percent in 2010 to 67 percent in 2014 as most Zambian ICT users access the internet via mobile phones.[2] As of March 2015, mobile internet users comprise 28 percent of the Zambian population, increasing from a mere 3 percent in 2011.[3] Meanwhile, internet connection speeds in Zambia are slow, averaging 1.3 Mbps compared to a global average of 3.9 Mbps, according to May 2015 data from Akamai’s report.[4] The costs of ICT ownership and access are very expensive and out of reach for the majority of citizens in Zambia, where the average minimum wage is approximately US per month.Blackberry devices are the most popular internet-enabled mobile phones in Zambia due to cheap subscription fees, which cost as low as US per month for access.The possession or use of narcotics, including soft drugs such as marijuana, is strictly prohibited.