BMI was calculated from measured height and weight at waves 2, 3, and 4 of the study.DV victimization was measured at waves 2, 3, and 4 by using items from the revised Conflict Tactics Scales.

child victimization maltreatment bullying and dating violence prevention and intervention-90child victimization maltreatment bullying and dating violence prevention and intervention-38child victimization maltreatment bullying and dating violence prevention and intervention-65

NOTE: THIS STANDING FOA HAS BEEN MODIFIED AS FOLLOWS: In Section IV.2.

The Project Description, Approach, the following text has been added to the end of the paragraph about approaches to data collection: Applicants may want to review the final rule published December 14, 2016 in the Federal Register regarding changes to data collection for AFCARS. This report from the Child Welfare Information Gateway provides state-level data from the National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System on reports of abuse and neglect made to child protective services (CPS) agencies.

Hanson Rochelle, F., Self-Brown, Shannon, Rostad, Whitney, L.

The what, when, and why of implementation frameworks for evidence-based practices in child welfare and child mental health service systems. Self- Brown, S., Cowart-Osborne, M., Baker, E., Thomas, A., Boyd Jr., C., Chege, E., Jackson, M., Meister, E., & Lutzker, J. Dad2K: An adaptation of Safe Care to enhance positive parenting skills with at-risk fathers. Self-Brown, S., Cowart-Osborne, M., Baker, E., Thomas, A., Boyd Jr., C., Chege, E., Jackson, M., Meister, E., & Lutzker, J. Dad2K: An adaptation of Safe Care to enhance positive parenting skills with at-risk fathers., 138-155.

For example, higher levels of bonding to parents and enhanced social skills can protect girls against victimization.

Similarly, for boys, high levels of parental bonding have been found to be associated with less externalizing behavior, which in turn is associated with less teen dating violence victimization.

In addition to teaching relationship skills, prevention programs can focus on promoting protective factors—that is, characteristics of a teen’s environment that can support healthy development—and positive youth development.

These can also be fostered by a teen’s home and community.

Should you recognize one of these red flags, the first step, in most cases, is to discuss your concern with your counselor. A good therapist should be open and willing to understand your concerns.

If your counselor doesn’t take your concerns seriously or is unwilling to accept feedback, then it’s probably in your best interest to consult with another therapist about it.

S., Cowart-Osborne, M., Self-Brown, S.,& Lutzker, J.