Fall 2001 GUIDANCE FOR ACCOMMODATING CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL DIETARY NEEDS IN THE SCHOOL NUTRITION PROGRAMS TABLE OF CONTENTS I. DEFINITIONS OF DISABILITY AND OF OTHER SPECIAL DIETARY NEEDS A. Please refer to the Acts noted above for a more detailed explanation.

Serving children with disabilities presents school food service staff with new challenges as well as rewards. Department of Education and will be periodically updated to reflect new scientific information or new statutory and program guidelines. DEFINITIONS OF DISABILITY AND OF OTHER SPECIAL DIETARY NEEDS A.

accommodating children special dietary needs 13 34-68

If so, then it will be important for you to learn: The good news is that there’s a lot of information available for parents.

(1) This guide can help you learn what you need to know.

To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, Room 326-W, Whitten Building, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D. USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. Minor updates were made and several obsolete appendices were deleted. The guidance was prepared in consultation with the U. The term "physical or mental impairment" includes many diseases and conditions, a few of which may be: orthopedic, visual, speech, and hearing impairments; cerebral palsy; epilepsy; muscular dystrophy; multiple sclerosis; cancer; heart disease; metabolic diseases, such as diabetes or phenylketonuria (PKU); food anaphylaxis (severe food allergy); mental retardation; emotional illness; drug addiction and alcoholism; specific learning disabilities; HIV disease; and tuberculosis.

Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability. This guidance presents information on how to handle situations that may arise and offers advice about such issues as funding and liability. DISABILITY Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act Under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990, a "person with a disability" means any person who has a physical or mental impairment which substantially limits one or more major life activities, has a record of such an impairment, or is regarded as having such an impairment.

Federal legislation and regulations are in place to ensure that children with disabilities have the same opportunities as other children.

This includes education and education-related benefits, such as school meals.

To obtain the hardcopy version of The facility should provide nourishing and attractive food for children according to a written plan developed by a qualified nutritionist/registered dietitian.

Caregivers/teachers, directors, and food service personnel should share the responsibility for carrying out the plan.

The Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Education of the Handicapped Act of 1975, and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 state that persons with disabilities have the support of these laws that prohibit discrimination and require that children be provided with a free and appropriate public education. In 2015, the USDA permitted states to expand the list of recognized medical authorities to improve access to meal accommodations for children with special dietary needs and alleviate administrative burden for the CNPs.

For more information, please refer to USDA Policy Memorandum SP 32-2015, SFSP 15-2015, CACFP 13-2015: Statements Supporting Accommodations for Children with Disabilities in the CNPs on the USDA Food and Nutrition Service School Meals Policy Web page at

This MB applies to agencies and sponsors of School Nutrition Programs (SNP), the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP), and the Summer Food Service Program (SFSP).